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Books 

Parallel Reading for 
Consulting Engineers 



David B. Steinman was born in the 
shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge and 
grew up to design another great 
structure, the Mackinac Bridge. 
His life has spanned three quar- 
ters of a century from the one 
bridge to the other and he has 
designed almost 400 bridges in be- 
tween. Highways Over Broad Wa- 
ters, by William Rattigan, is the 
story of these years, or better, the 
story of these bridges. 

We follow Steinman through a 
precocious childhood, hawking 
newspapers on the bridge he loved, 
to City College of New York. Never 
satisfied with any grade less than 
perfect, his mind absorbed a myriad 
of subjects. He went on to Colum- 
bia, teaching and learning, earning 
his way with lecturing and scholar- 
ships, but always with engineer- 
ing in his mind. His eye was al- 
ways on the bridge. In order to 
secure his PhD he succeeded in 
having D. Van Nostrand publish 
his first book and, incidentally, his 
thesis, Suspension Bridges and 
Cantilevers. 

When he was 25, he established 
a working relationship with Gus- 



tave Lindenthal, then the dean of 
American bridge builders. Soon 
the design of his first two bridges 
were under way. These were the 
Hell Gate Bridge over the East 
River and the Sciotoville Bridge 
over the Ohio. It was during this 
period that he realized the value 
of "financial engineering" and he 
developed the understanding of fi- 
nance that enabled him to talk so 
convincingly to bankers. 

After World War I, bridge en- 
gineering had a slight decline and 
again Steinman supplemented his 
income by teaching. Along with 
the regular courses in engineering 
subjects, he started the first course 
in Aeronautics ever taught in the 
U.S. His interest in this subject was 
to prove of great value later in de- 
veloping his theory of aerodynamic 
principles as applied to suspension 
bridges. His Mackinac Bridge is 
the first bridge which has a critical 
wind velocity of infinity. Shortly 
after this teaching period, he set 
up the partnership which has lasted 
throughout his professional life. 
Holton D. Robinson was the other 
principal and their first job was the 
Florianapolis Bridge in Brazd. 



Over the years many more 
bridges were to come from his 
drawing boards. His interest in the 
profession developed into an ob- 
session and he was one of the lead- 
ers in establishing registration. He 
wrote the registration law for New 
York State which is the accepted 
model today. He continued to write 
and lecture, he edited engineering 
magazines and held office in prac- 
tically all the civil engineering so- 
cieties. Steinman is credited with 
over 500 technical articles and 
books. One of his proudest achieve- 
ments outside of the field of engi- 
neering is his book about the 
Roeblings and the Brooklvn Bridge 
called The Builders of the Bridge. 



A list of his patents and hobbies 
reveals the scope of his mind and 
his many nonengineering honors 
reveal the concentration he gives 
to his avocations. Steinman s pat- 
ents on Stereo photography were 
sold to Hollywood and his color 
photographs have received many 
prizes. But the diversion which has 
absorbed him for the last few years 
is poetry. 






ENGINEERING 
NEWSRECORD 



X- TG/40 
Ss 



. . . International 



Pakistani Bridge to Carry 
Rail and Highway Traffic 

Foundation work had begun on an 
807-ft-span bridge that will carry rail 
and auto traffic over the Rohri Channel 
of the Indus River at Sulckur, West 
Pakistan. The new span will replace 
the present Lansdowne Bridge. 

The spandrel-braced arch will rest on 
massive concrete abutments. A. single- 
track railway will be set in a concrete 
deck, which will also carrv the auto 
traffic. 

The S3.2-million construction con- 
tract went to Dorman Long Bridge 
and Engineering, Ltd. in association 
with Gammon Pakistan, Ltd. David 
B. Steinman of New York City is con- 
sulting engineer. Contract time is 20 
months. 



March 10, 1960 







Poets' Study Club i*»* jtouU-s*&*«*, 



April 6, 1960 



My dear Dr. Steinman: 

Since the arrival of SONGS OF A 
BRIDGE BUILDER, with your compliments, it has 
been read, re-read, read aloud and favorite poems 
chanted for memorizing. Finding BLUEPRINT in- 
cluded makes our Poetry Club very happy, indeed. 

We find it refreshing to read poetry 
that communicates so readily, is so lyrical, and 
ranges with such human understanding from Hart 
Crane to the bewildered grand -daughter with her 
new baby brother. Not one note of cynicism mars 
the entire edition. The intimate, ANGEL, SIREN, 
WOMAN, persuaded us that you were a very genuine 
person. Then we found the list of your achievements 
inside the book jacket, and have just emerged from 
the state of consternation which that induced. All of 
our literature about the BRIDGE AT MACKINAC 
does bear your name, but we had no association 
for BLUEPRINT. 

May we say that this discovery leaves 
us re-assured that world peace may be possible yet as 
long as these bridge builders, who can, thus carry on 
toward unity, and keep singing meanwhile? 

Very sincerely yours, 



^J%i ; lr^^ri(W r 



Ruby Anne Bright 



K-TS 140 

Be 



SPIRIT 

A MAGAZINE OF POETRY 



MARCH 




David B. Steinman is one of the world's most distinguished bridge- 
builders. From his designs, more than 400 water-spanning structures of im- 
posing sweep, beauty and stability have been erected and put into commis- 
sion on five continents of the globe. One of his masterpieces is the superb 
web of steel which recently linked the upper and lower peninsulas of MidiT 
igan. Presently on his drawing-boards are equally-bold structures to be 
built across the Sea of Bosporus and the Straits of Messina. But Dr. Stein- 
man is more than a great engineer. He is a warm and dedicated human 
being, a gentle philosopher, a humanitarian and a poet. Endowed since 
early boyhood with a powerful attraction to the harmonious combination 
of utility and beauty which we call design, he has underpinned his ex- 
ceptional skills with two unshakable supports: faith in God as the Designer 
supreme, and a profound conviction that the function of science is to serve 
man, not to enslave him. 

These elements in Dr. Steinman's makeup are apparent in every word 
he writes, just as they impinge themselves upon every blueprint he completes 
and countersigns. Characteristic are the fifty-two poems grouped here as 
"Songs of a Bridgebuilder." They comprise a selection from the 150 or 
more short lyrics he has found time to put on paper in pensive hours away 
from the challenging encounter with compass, caisson and cable-drum. 
Many of them, here and there set off with chastely-etched illustrations, are 
in moods of reverence and aspiration. Most of them have appeared in 
periodicals and anthologies. In general, they do not have the tension, 
daring or technical perfection of his spun steel. But with the breath of a 
buoyantly religious spirit blowing through them, they do afford a harp-like 
accompaniment, as do his high-strung bridges, to the brave I aid ate Dom- 



1960 



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NEW YORK, MONDAY, JANUARY 11, HMO, 



COAST TEST BEGUN ON TRANSIT PLAN 

Drills Begin Boring tha Bed of San Francitco Bay— 4-Mtfe Tuba Envisioned 



SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. » — 
-.jilminary work began this 
v.\.jk on what engineers envi- 
ron as "the key piece" of a 
■••iwt rapid-transit network for 
the San Francisco Bay area. 

-rom a barge anchored in 
the bay, drills started boring 
Into the mud, clay and rock 
strata at depths ranging from 
173 to 250 feet under water. 

In nine of the submerged 
holes at various depths will be 
placed sensitive instruments 
known as "geophones." They 
are to be ihstalled during the 
next five or six weeks to record 
earthquake vibrations along the 
proposed route of a four-mlle- 
long tube that would carry 
rapid-transit trains between the 
San Francisco Peninsula and 
the East Bay area. 

This tube, the construction of 
which was approved by the 
1959 California Legislature, dan 
assertedly be completed, along 
with the rest of the first phase 
.of a bay area rapid-transit sys- 
tem, in about five years after 
funds are made available. One 
or two "ifs" stand in the way 
of actually starting construc- 
tion. 

Approval Is Conditional 

The Legislature approved the 
$115,000,000 tube project pro- 
vided that the voters of five 
counties supported by a two- 
thirds majority a bond Issue of 
at least $500,000,000 for the 
building of feeder lines. 

These would Include such 
Items as a subway under 
Market Street in this city and 
a rapid-transit line extending 
thirty.five miles south of 
Mountain View, below Palo 
Alto. Feeders over East Bay 
and one over the Golden Gate 
Bridge are also envisioned. 

In anticipation of the opera- 
tion of trains into Marin 
County, beyond the Golden 
Gate, the five-county Bay Area 



Rapid Transit District has en- 
gaged David B. Htolnm.n a 
New tvtk Bridge engineer, for 
preliminary study. 

He will conduct a four-month 
investigation to determine 
whether it is feasible, from an 
engineering standpoint, to add 
rapid-transit facilities to the 
Golden Gate Bridge. John M. 
Peirce, general manager of the 
transit district, and his associ- 
ates want to know whether two 
lanes of rapid transit could be 
installed without Impairing the 
bridge's safety. 

Goats Estimated 

The cost of the project, under 
study for years as a means of 
keeping automobile traffic from 
completely paralysing down- 
town San Francisco, has been 
estimated at up to $700,000,000. 

The Legislature nut an esti- 
mate of $84,000,000 on the tube 
itself. The remaining $31,000,- 
000 in the $115,000,000 tube 
project is to cover the cost of 
approaches at both ends. The 
money is to come from surplus 
automobile tolls from the San 
Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. 

The engineering feasibility of 
building the tube has already 
been established, according to 
Keneth M. Hoover, chief en- 
gineer of the rapid transit dis- 
trict 

John o. Bickel, a partner in 
Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade A 

£?- "M 5* whlch t0 ■*' » 

Jvas still to be established. The 
tube is to be prefabricated in 
sections, ballasted and sunk 
into a trench. 

f-^ffu^J* t0 bulld * tub * 
to withstand stresses as great 
as those Imposed by the San 
Francisco earthquake of 1906 
« is the present intention to 
ask voters of San Francisco 
ana neighboring counties to 
ballot on the $500,000,000 bond 
props**! next November 



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The <£yric 




Winter, i960 



THE CHALLENGE 

Nature said: "You cannot." 

Man replied: "I can." 
From shore to shore, above the tides, 

He built a gleaming span. 

Nature said: "You dare not." 

Man replied: "I dare." 
He launched his winged ship aloft 

And boldly sailed the air. 

Nature said: "You shall not." 

Man replied: "I will." 
He caged the thunderbolts of Jove 

And made them serve his skill. 

Nature said: "You must not." 

Man replied: "I must." 
He split the atom. Now he holds 

A godlike power in trust. 

D. B. Steinman 






56 



GOLDEN ATOM 




Light-Years 

Through cosmic space the lens on Palomar, 
Scanning the aeons of galactic glow, 
Descries the ancient flaming of a star 
Whose rays ten million centuries ago 
Commenced their journey with the speed of light, 
At length impinging on our crystal prism, 
Although the source may now be black as night 
Or vanished in some titan cataclysm. 
With powers wrested from the atom's core, 
Our priests of science batter heaven's gate. 
Who knows what doom will be the final score, 
What holocaust or glory be our fate? 
Upon some star a future eye may see 
The light we beam into eternity. 

D. B. Steinman 



'59-'60 







ENINSULA 



JJu 



J, 



J Bird 



unler an 



As meteors burned before his eyes in wonder, 
The small boy thought it not at all absurd 
To fling him starward and to ride the thunder 
And take alive the uncapturable bird. 

Year upon year, pursuit; he almost touched 
The flawless plumage he had sought from youth ; 
And when he died, men said, his fingers clutched 
A single feather from the wings of truth. 

— D. B. Steinman 
in SPIRIT 
(Winner of: The Carrie Blaine Yeiser Award) 



L 



J-^oetry Society 
of Fffichiaan 

Winter 1959- 60 







in the world of 



BOOKS 



David B. Steinman '06 

Songs of a Bridge Builder (Eerdmans) 
A collection of poems by a famous 

bridge engineer. 




JANUARY. I960 






Men and Jobs 



D. B. Steinman Raises 
Three to Partnership 

Effective January 1, R. M. Boynton, 
C. H. Gronquist and J. London were 
taken into partnership by D. B. Stein- 
man, consulting engineer, New York 
City. The new firm name will be Stein- 
man, Boynton, Gronquist & London. 

Each of the three new partners has 
been with Mr. Steinman for more than 
thirty years. They have participated in 
the design of such notable suspension 
structures as the Mackinac Straits 
Bridge, Michigan; Kingston-Rhinecliff 
Bridge over the Hudson River; Mount 
Hope Bridge, Rhode Island; and the 
Deer Isle-Sedgewick Bridge, Sargent- 
ville, Me. They also designed the Char- 
ter Oak Bridge, Hartford, Conn, and 
Quinnipiac River Bridge, New Haven, 
Conn., with long continuous plate- 
girder spans; the Henry Hudson Arch, 
New York City; and the Thousand Is- 
lands International Bridge, over the St. 
Lawrence River. 

Mr. Boynton is a 1920 civil-engineer- 
ing graduate of the University of Maine. 
He joined Mr. Steinman in 1928 after 
eight years with the Erie Railroad Co. 

Mr. Gronquist received a B.S. in 
1925 and an M.S. in 1927 from Rutgers. 
He joined Mr. Steinman in 1927. 

Mr. London is a 1920 civil-engineer- 
ing graduate of the College of the City 
of New York. He went with Mr. Stein- 
man in 1922, after brief experience as 
a draftsman and instructor. 



January 14, 1960 • ENGINEERING NEWS-RECORD 



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BETHANY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



Vol. LIII 



JANUARY, 1960 



Number 1 



Degree Of Doctor Of Humane Letters To Be Conferred 
On David Barnard Steinman, Bridge Builder And Poet 




Dr. David Barnard Steinman 



The faculty and trustees of Bethany 
College have voted unanimously to confer 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane 
Letters upon Dr. David Bernard Stein- 
man, noted bridge builder, engineer and 
poet. 

Dr. Perry Epler Gresham, President of 
Bethany College, announced that the 
L.H.D. degree will be conferred on Dr. 
Steinman May 7, 1960. Steinman will 
speak that day during a convocation 
which will be a part of the annual fine 
arts festival of the school. 

Dr. Steinman, dean of American 
bridge builders, has designed and built 
more than 440 bridges on tive continents, 
including Michigan's famous Mackinac 
bridge. More than 150 of his poems 
have been published in leading poetry 
magazines and in five anthologies. 

"The faculty and board of trustees of 
Bethany College voted the honorary de- 
gree L.H.D. to Doctor Steinman on ac- 
count of the fact that he exemplifies the 
academic ideals of Bethany College," Dr. 
Gresham said. 

"He is one of the foremost engineers in 
the world who has the broad literary and 
cultural interests of a true product of 
the liberal arts and sciences. Doctor 
Steinman has achieved distinction as a 
great humanist. 

"We hope this honorary degree con- 
ferred in the presence of all our students 
will inspire them to emulate his good 
example." 

Dr. Steinman is now engaged on the 
world's first intercontinental bridge over 
the Bosporus, and also on bridges in 
Baghdad and Pakistan. He also de- 
signed and planned the new 12,000-foot 
international bridge over the St. Marys 
River at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., and its 
Canadian counterpart. 

Dr. Steinman holds honorary degrees 
from two of the oldest and most dis- 
tinguished schools in the world, the Uni- 
versity of Bologna in Italy and the 
University of Paris in France. He 
received the B.S. degree summa cum 
laude from the College of the City of 
New York, the M.A. and the Ph.D. de- 
grees from Columbia University. 

He is the author of 24 books, including 
"Famous Bridges of the World," "Mack- 
inac Straits Bridge," "Suspension 
Bridges," and "Song of a Bridge 
Builder." He has written (500 profes- 
sional articles. 

Dr. Steinman has received more than 
50 prizes, awards and honors for poetry. 
He is a life member and a former trustee 
of the Poetry Society of America. 



Oke BRO<i 



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f#l 



■'oft 



FRIDAY MARKET 



YOU WORE A WHITE GARDENI 



nnnnnn 



D. B. STEINMAN 



I met you in a garden by the sea; 

With pulses pounding, I beheld you there. 
Your loveliness was like a melody: 

You wore a white gardenia in your hair. 

My heart was singing with a strange delight; 

To all the gods of love I made my prayer. 
My dreams embraced you through the starry night, 

A fragrant white gardenia in your hair. 

All else about the distant scene is dim, 

All save the moonlight magic in the air; 

One memory still lingers like a hymn: 

A white gardenia star-like in your hair. 

A lighted candle burning through the years, 
I feel your glowing presence everywhere; 

In lonely nights I see you through my tears: 
You wore a white gardenia in your hair. 



Ill I 



Poetry, for Dr Steinman, is a recent hobby. When people, here anc 
abroad, wrote to him 'Your bridges are poems', he was inspired to 
take the next step. In addition to putting poetry into bridges, he is 
now putting bridges into poetry. 

Dr Steinman's poems are noted for their spiritual inspiration as 
well as for their singing, lyrical quality. A number of them have 
already been set to music. — Press notice. Songs of a Bridgebuilder 
by D. B. Steinman, Wm B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. 



April i960 



• Consu Iring 

Encjin ee r 



Feb. 



1960 












D. B. Steinman, Consulting Engi- 
neer, has taken into partnership his 
associates R. M. Boynton, C. H. 
Gronquist, and J. London. These 
associates have been with Dr. Stein- 
man for over 30 years and have 
been identified with him in the 
design and construction of over 
400 bridges. The firm name has I 
been changed to Steinman, Boyn- 



ton, Gronquist & London, Consult- 
ing Engineers. 



I 



» 
















X - VVj; v <\0 












1 oo™ HH 

■ S\J YEAR 






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Engineer Sponsors Chosen 
For 1960 Engineers' Week 



Thirteen leading engineering fig 
ures will act as sponsors for the 1960 
National Engineers' Week, February 
21-27. 



They are: Wernher von Braun, di- 
rector, Development Operations Divi- 
sion, Army Ballistic Missile Agency; 
Allen B. DuMont, chairman of the 
board, Allen B. DuMont Labora- 
tories, Inc.; T. Keith Glennan, pres- 
ident-on-leave, Case Institute of Tech- 
nology, and administrator, National 
Aeronautics & Space Administration ; 
James R. Killian, Jr., chairman of 
the Corporation, Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology; Clarence H. Lin- 
der, vice president, General Electric 
Company; Granville M. Read, chief 
engineer, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 



and Company; Royal W. Sorensen, 
California Institute of Technology; 
Philip Sporn, president, American 
Electric Power Company; David B. ; 
Steinman, consulting engineer; Bert- 
ram D. Tallamy, Federal Highway 
Administrator; Charles Allen Thom- 
as, president, Monsanto Chemical 
Company; John L. Burns, president, 
Radio Corporation of America, and 

A. V. Wiebel, president, Tennessee 
Coal & Iron Division, United States 
Steel Corporation. 

The theme for the 1960 observance 
is "Engineerings' Great Challenge . . . 
The 1960's." The week is under the 
general sponsorship of the 53,000- 
member National Society of Profes- 
sional Engineers. 



FEBRUARY 1960 



Metropolitan & Northern New Jersey 

Published inintl*, A.. #/,- \*-*~~ j. - 1:. , *r 

BULLETIN 



Published jointly by the Metropolitan and 
the Northern New Jersey Sections 



=^=^5££d^2£^^^^^^Ti^^ii^ 






MARCH, I960 



THE ENGINEER'S BOOKSHELF 

Po«,y, combining b„ uty , nc m '°i"g' ™ POS " h ' S 

Bom of poor immijroo, p.ran,, „„ M , nhait , n . s ,„.„„„,„ 

»"o P ;.Ti-TTb,r i r;L" i "t" i * b s' t : a pro ° F f °< ; "4*" 

tasted the bitter fcJiJ. «fj ' ■ m En <? lne Steinman 

oiraus in iy58 the Brooklyn Bridge hm'lr k„ t-»,= d i_t- 

as ever been his inspiration. His^cioto H e Br dge'tro"! s* 
the Ohio River completed in 1917 was the start of a new type 
of continuous bndge which embodied many novel and S 
features of construction. He has received nine honors n a 
wards for the most beautiful bridges in America OfrU 
than 400 bridges he has built alfover the w S, Zfy ™H 

ges ofTe'"- eX,St r Ce n ay - * t0 ° k dynamke and " rge cha 

::" e rh '^ k ,"r" .^_ h . i !. a f soci . ates «* ««!., has r en - 



D.B. 



i , Mjj ^»-iai.cs ana mend*; hnc r»« 

dered more than lip serv i ce to his chosen profession' His life- 
long motto has been "Every man is a debtorto his profession" 
His unswerving goal has been a continuous selling campaign 

Pledges in the amount of almost half a million dollars 

s^eT/h/"' tH K S ?7 k h3S SUCh 3 dee P «-Ptadoo.l mes- 
sage to the youth of America at this particular time I arm 

o e n V 7e P b a r o e k n lhHf. teenaRertO «- di — Pi- it as a " m^ 

Reuben Krieg 







The world's first bridge to link 
two continents is being constructed 
in Turkey across the Bosphorus, 
with a between -towers suspension 
span of 3,091 feet, to connect Euro- 
pean and Asian Turkey ; the plans 
were drawn by the New York en- 
gineering firm of D. B. Steinman. 






FEBRUARY 22, 1960 






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STURGI5, MICHIGAN, FEBRUARY 17, 1960 






Mackinac Bridge Called New Northwest Passage 



When it opened Nov. 1, 1957, 
Michigan's breath-taking Mackinac 
bridge was hailed by Gov. G. 
Mennen Williams as "a modern 
Northwest Passage." 

'eed, the giant bridge has 
i h .lated a greater flow of long- 
distance travel through Michigan 
to the Rocky Mountain and Pacific 
states and to the Canadian prov- 
inces. 

But in far greater measure it 
has opened new avenues of com- 
merce and tourist travel between 
upper and lower Michigan and be- 
tween Michigan and ita immediate 
neighbors in the north central re- 
gion. 

Four years In the building and 
costing almost $100 million, the 
Mackinac bridge (pronounced 
Mack-in-aw) emerged in 1957 as 
one of the greatest of the man- 
made wonders of the world . . . 
an artistically Impressive million- 
ton combination of steel and con- 
crete linking the upper and lower 
peninsulas of Michigan. 

Measured between its enormous 
cable anchorage blocks— each of 
them about a third of a football 
field in size — it is the world's 
longest suspension span . . . 8,614 
feet. 

Including lt» approaches, It is 
five miles long . . . 28,372 feet to 
be exact . . . and cuts what was 
once a minimum crossing time of 
one hour on the ferries between 
M- -kinaw City and St. Ignace to 

inutes. 
faring its first 12 months of 
operation, the four-lane structure 
carried 1.411,500 vehicles . . . 
54 per cent more traffic than the 
ferries transported across the 
Straits of Mackinac the year be- 
fore. 



Century-Old Dream 

Its erection fulfilled a century- 
old dream of northern Michigan 
travellers for a bridge across the 
turbulent straits. 

The Mackinac bridge is Michi- 
gan's only domestic highway toll 
route. Its operators — the Mack- 
inac Bridge Authority, created by 
the 1950 legislature — believe it 
will attract enough traffic to repay 
its $99,800,000 revenue bond issue 
in 25 to 30 years . , . after which 
toll charges will either be elim- 
inated or sharply reduced to cover 
only the cost of maintenance. 

In the first eight months of 1959, 
the bridge drew 30 per cent more 
trucks and other commercial ve- 
hicles than in the same period 
the year before . . . indicative of 
the stimulating effect the span is 
having on the state's commercial 
development. 

The story of the Mackinac bridge 
is told only in the superlatives 
matching the relentless deter- 
mination of generations of Michi- 
gan people to unite their two great 
peninsulas no matter what the 
financial cost nor the engineering 
difficulty. 

Its ivory-colored suspension tow- 
ers .. . standing 552 feet above 
water, higher than the Penobscot 
building in Detroit, Michigan's 
tallest skyscraper ... are 3,800 
ifeet apart, astride a gorge in the 
, straits 295 feet deep. 

While the central span between 
the towers is slightly shorter than 
that of the Golden Gate bridge, 
Mackinac's 8,614 feet between the 
massive concrete cable anchorages 
make it the world's longest sus- 
pension bridge. 

From their rock foundations to 
their tip, the cable towers are 762 
feet high . . . and each contains 



6,500 tons of steel. Above water 
they rise as high as a 46-story of- 
fice building . . . and almost as 
high as the 555-foot Washington 
Monument. 

Leading to the suspension span 
itself are 28 truss spans, ranging 
in length from 160 to 560 feet 
. . . making a total expanse of 
19,243 feet (more than 3'a miles) 
of steel superstructure. 

The bridge arches gracefully 
over the straits, allowing 155 feet 
of clearance at midspan for the 
largest ships to pass safely be- 
neath. At that point, the roadway 
of the span is 199 feet above water. 
Weight 66,500 Tom 

The two suspension cables — 68 
feet apart — are more than two 
feet in diameter (24V4 Inches), 
fabricated of 42,000 miles of wire 
. . . enough to reach one and two- 
thirds times around the equator. 
The cable* weigh 11,840 tons. 

Weight of the superstructure is 
66.500 tons . . . and of the foun- 
dations and superstructure to- 
gether, 1,024,500 tons. 

The concrete blocks in which the 
suspension cables are anchored 
are each 135 feet long and capa- 
ble of resisting 30,000 torn of pull 
from the two cables which support 
the main span. 

Each of the anchorage blocks 
contains more than 85,000 cubic 
yards of concrete — enough to 
build 26 miles of two-lane pave- 
ment. More than 466,300 cubic 
yards of concrete went into the 
entire structure, for a total of 931,- 
000 tons of concrete. 

The four-lane bridge has a 48- 
foot-wide roadway, with opposing 
traffic separated by a raised cen- 
ter mall two feet wide. At the 

permitted speed of 45 miles an 
hour, it is capable of handling 



3,000 cart an hour . . . and if used 
to capacity could accommodate in 
one week the volume of traffic 
carried during an entire year on 
the ferry fleet which the bridge 
replaced. 

The bridge is designed to with- 
stand wind velocity of 632 miles 
an hour ... far more than has 
ever been recorded at Mackinac 
. . . and is engineered to resist ice 
pressures greatly in excess of any- 
thing known or considered pos- 
sible at the straits. Some 85,000 
blueprints and 4,000 engineering 
drawings were used in its con- 
struction, guiding the work of the 
10,350 men employed on the proj- 
ect at the bridge site and in the 
quarries, shops, mills and other 
supply points. 

The 10-minute bridge crossing 
brings Michigan's two peninsulas 
about 150 miles closer together in 
driving time . . . for, when ferries 
were in use, it was customary to 
have to wait a considerable time 
for a crossing. At times during 
the deer hunting season, traffic 
waiting to board the ferries was 
lined up for 17 mites. 

Despite the immensity of the job, 
construction proceeded on schedule 
during the four-year building pe- 
riod, and the bridge was opened 
to traffic Nov. 1, 1957, the date an- 
nounced before the project started. 
It was formally dedicated in elab- 
orate ceremonies June 25-28, 1958. 

Its designer and chief engineer, 
Dr. David B. Steinman, says the 
Mackinac bridge should remain 
serviceable for at least a century. 

In 1959 the American Institute 
of Steel Construction designated 
the structure as "America's most 
beautiful bridge." 

Cop'r 1959 Federated Publica- 
tion; Inc. 



"o 8 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 

AMERICAN 
CONCRETE 
INSTITUTE 



#V/*. 



I960 



Steinman takes associates 
into firm partnership 



D. B. Steinman, consulting engineer, 
New York, has taken into partnership 
his associates R. M. Boynton, C. H. 
Gronquist, and J. London. These asso- 
ciates have been with Dr. Steinman 
from 31 to 38 years, and have been 
identified with him in the design and 
construction of over 400 bridges includ- 
ing some of the world's most notable 
structures. 

The new firm will operate under the 
name of Steinman, Boynton, Gron- 
quist and London, Consulting Engi- 
neers. 



5ft 



DL BROOKLYN ENGINEER 




ACCOMPLISHMENT 



/ 



March, 1960 



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ACIER 
STAHL 
STEEL 



MAI 1960 






JOURNAL 

OF THE 

AMERICAN 
CONCRETE 
INSTITUTE 



Steinman awarded 
21st honorary degree 

David B. Steinman, internationally 
eminent bridge engineer of New York 
City, was recently awarded his 21st 
honorary degree. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of 
Fine Arts was conferred upon Dr. 
Steinman at the formal convocation 
in May of the Spring Arts Festival at 
Bethany College in West Virginia. The 
degree is in recognition of his achieve- 
ments as a poet and as a builder of 
beautiful bridges. Nine of Dr. Stein- 
man's bridges have been honored in 
the annual awards for the most beauti- 
ful bridges in America. 



/ 



JULY, 1960 



NEW YORK STATE CITIZENS COMMITTEE 
FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, INC. 
2 West kS Street 
New York 36, New York 

Telephone: OX ford 7-7^20 

Violet Edwards, Executive Director 

For Release: IMMEDIATE 
DAVID B. STEINMAN, CONSULTING ENGINEER, HAS BEEN APPOINTED CHAIRMAN FOR THE ENGINEERING 
PROFESSION IN THE I960 VOLUNTEER FUNO RAISING CAMPAIGN FOR THE NEW YORK STATE CITIZENS 
COMMITTEE FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Like other prominent men serving in like capacities throughout New York State, 
Dr. Steinman will seek the support of his industry for the Citizen Committee's 
statewide educational program. Formed eight years ago, the Committee, with headquarters 
at 2 West 45 Street in New York City, is a non-profit organization. Through field 
services and an information exchange program the Committee helps almost 2,000 local 
citizen school groups in the state work to strengthen their school programs. It also 
aids citizens councils of other states. 

Dr. Steinman, internationally eminent engineer of over MO bridges on five con- 
tinents, has achieved recognition as an engineer, scientist, mathematician, artist, 
inventor, br idgebui lder, educator, lecturer, author, poet and humanitarian. His life 
and work have been an inspiration to thousands of young engineers and engineering 
students not only in America but throughout the world. Particularly outstanding 
in his long record of service to education was his establishment of the David B. 
Steinman Foundation for grants to education, for research and for student aid, a 
foundation of which he is president. 

Honored with twenty-six academic degrees - four earned and twenty-two honorary- 
and 350 awards and citations, including the French Legion of Honor, Dr. Steinman 
holds membership in over 200 organizations - professional, scientific, civic and 
honorary - in this country and abroad. His home and his office in the firm of Steinman, 
Boynton, Gronquist and London are in New York City, but he is a registered Professional 
Engineer in 25 states and foreign countries. 



- 




KINGS COUNTY 

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER 

Published by the Kings County Chapter 
ol the 

NEW YORK STATE SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 

Incorporated 



JUNE. 1960 



DR. STEINMAN AGAIN HONORED 
At the formal convocation May 7 of 
the Spring Arts Festival at Bethany Col- 
lege in West Virginia, the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Fine Arts was con- 
ferred upop David B. Steinman, inter- 
nationally eminent bridge engineer of 
New York City. This degree brings Dr. 
Steinman's total to twenty-five and is in 
recognition of his achievements as a poet 
and as a builder of beautirul bridges. 
Nine of Dr.,Steinman's bridges have been 
honored in the annual awards for the 
most beautiful bridges in America. 



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S oH 



THE AUSTRALASIAN 

ENGINEER 



February, 1960 




INDUS RIVER 8RID6E, PAKISTAN 

By Dr. D. B. Steinman 

The new railroad bridge over the Indus River, near Suklcur in West Pakistan, will be the longest railroad arch span in Asia 

and the third longest in the world (exceeded only by the Hell Gate Arch and the Sydney Harbour Bridge). 
The new bridqe will be a steel trussed arch with a span of 80/ feet between end pins of bottom rib. The rise of the bot- 
tom rib is 180 feet and the distance between ribs of the crown is 24 feet, making the total height of structure 204 feet. 
The new bridge is to be constructed 100 feet downstream from and will replace the seventy-year-old Lansdowne Bridge for 
railway traffic. The old structure, a famous cantilever bridge built in 1889 by Sir A. M. Rendel will be converted to highway 

use efter the arch bridge is completed. 
The plans for the new bridge were completed in I9S9, and construction is scheduled for completion In 1961. 






.Si 

Wheeling 

T ¥ World-wide News and Pictures C^]l 

News -Register 

J* * Neighborhood News •— ^"of a ^^ 250,000 Community 



WHEELING, W. VA., TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 28 1960 



Many Features in Program 

Fifth Spring Festival 
At Bethany May 6-8 



The Fifth Annual Spring Fes- 
tival will be held May 6-8 at Beth- 
any College. 

A concert will be presented by 
the male chorus; under the di- 
rection of Professor. George Haupt- 
fuehrer, at 8:30 p.m. May 6. 

Earlier, the thfee-day program 
will begin with a movie. "Mack- 
inac Bridge Diary." at 7:30 p.m. 
May 6. The film depicts the story 
of the planning and building of the 
bridge over the Straits of Macki- 
nac in northern Michigan. The 
bridge was designed by Dr. David 
B. Steinman. 

Dr. Steiinnan. the noted bridge 
builder, will speak at a formal 
convocation at 11 p.m. May 7, on 
"The Three Dimensions of Man." 
Bethany will confer the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Fine Arts on 
Dr. Steinman. 

A tea to mark the opening of 
the art exhibit will be at 1:30 
p.m. May 7. Chairman of the ex- 
hibit Is Professor Kent K. McAlex- 
ander. 

Art prizes for the spring festival 
will be the Eleanor G. Caldwell 
award and the Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
N. Berkman award. 



A 'concert of students ailtt faculty 
composers will be at 3:30 p.m. 
that day. 

Dido and Aeneas, an opera by 
Henry Purcell. and Riders to the 
Sea, a play by John Millington 
Synge. will be presented at 8:30 
p.m. May 7. They will be directed 

and staged by Dr. Dale A. Jor- 
genson and Professor John Babing- 

(00. 

The mother's day activities will 
begin with worship at 10:45 May 
8 at Bethany Memorial Church. 
The speaker will be Robert Lem- 
on. Parents will attend services 
with the college students. 

President and Mrs. Perry 
Gresham will be hosts at a tea 
at 3 p.m. 

There will be a Greek Sing at 
the Outdoor Amphitheatre. Martha 
Wagner is president of the Pan- 
Hellenic Council and Glenn Red- 
dington is president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council. 

In concluding the three-day pro- 
gram, the 35 - member Bethany 
College concert choir will present 
a concert under the direction of 
Professor Jorgenson. 






_^£2 



Chicago's American 



TUESDAY— APRIL 5—1960 



Loyola Offers 
Pulitzer Author 

Pulitzer prize winner 
Robert Penn Warren will 
read and comment on his 
work tomorrow at Loyola 
university's fifth and last 
David B. Steinman lecture 
for 1959-60. The program, 
scheduled for 8 p. m. in the 
Grand ballroom of Lewis 
towers, is free and open to 
the public. 



Consu Iting 

Engineer 



Connecticut Bridge Job 

The firm of Steinman, Boynton, 
Gronquist & London has been re- 
tained by the State of Connecticut 
for the survey and design of an 
eight mile stretch of new express 
highway passing through Cheshire, 
Southington, and Meriden. The 
contract requires a total of 54 
bridges, including eight stream 
crossings, 42 grade separations, and 
four pedestrian overpasses. 

In the town of Meriden, the 
route will wind through the hills 
of Hubbard Park. A wide median 
of variable width will permit each 
roadway to follow the contours 
without marring the beauty of the 
park. Structures in this area will be 
given special architectural treat- 
ment to harmonize with the sur- 
roundings. Present plans call for a 
four-lane, divided highway. ** 



May 1960 







heeling Jlntelligencer 



Monday, May 16, 1960 



Dr. Steinman Gives 
Bethany $10,000 

Dr. David B. Steinman, of New York City, dean of the 
American bridge builders and a noted poet, is contributing 
an initial gift of $10,000 to Bethany College to start an en- 
dowment for the establishing of an annual poetry lectureship. 
The new program will be known 

as the David B. Steinman Poetry current funds to begin the lee- 
Lectureship, Dr. Perry E. Gres- ture series in the academic year 
ham, College President, ah- of 1960-61, Dr. Gresham said, 
nounced today. In announcing the gift, Dr 

Dr. Steinman delivered an ad- Steinman said that poetry and art 
mm. mu t,- • are potent forces in civilization, 

dress on The Three Dimensions The F gpiritual dimens ion and art 



of Man" at a special convocation 
during the annual spring art? 
festival May 7 at the College. Dr 



Steinman's interest in Bethany Steinman said. 



and science make for hign qual- 
; ty education and a tradition to 
be prized and cherished. Dr. 



was developed through his life- 
long friendship with Junius T, 



Dr. Steinman has designed and 
built more than 440 bridges on 



Moore, structural engineer, from fi ve continents", including Michi 

Charleston, W. Va. gan's famous Mackinac bridge 

The poetry lectureship wi'l He is now engaged in building 

bring the leading contemporary the world's first intercontinental 

poets to Bethany College. bridge over the Bosporus, and 

The income from the endow also on bridges in Baghdad and 

ment will be supplemented by Pakistan. 





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Consu Itinif 
Engin ee r 



March 1960 



Golden Gate Bridge Study 

The firm of David B. Steinman has 
been selected for a $50,000 study 
to determine whether the Golden 
Gate Bridge can carry rapid transit 
trains without impairing its safety. 
Awaiting the results of this study 
is a contemplated $500 million 
bond issue referendum to expand 
the area's public transportation 
system. 






• 




JUNE 1960 



X' TG/40 
.Ss 



NATIONAL\ 
/SOCIETY OF\ 
PROFESSIONS 
i ENGINEERS J 



BR A zL 



pEku 



5 



uR^AY. 



jtftGENlj>|A. 



X- TO- 140 

.A? 



BARDIC ECHOES 



April 1960 



I BUILT A BRIDGE 

I built a bridge across the tide 
To reach a long-dreamed goal; 

And there, beside a woodland stream, 
God's peace restored my soul. 

I built a bridge across a vale 
To reach a flower-strewn slope; 

My plan was traced as sunbeams wove 
A rainbow arch of hope. 

I built a bridge across a gulf 

To reach my fellow man; 
With heart aglow he came halfway 

And helped me build the span. 

I built a bridge across the years 

To reach tranquility: 
I did not know how beautiful 

The last of life could be. 

I built a bridge across the dark 

To reach the unknown shore, 
And there I found supernal love 

And peace forevermore. 

-- D. B. Steinman, New York 




Cable-supported cantilever design loses out to . . 



.S8 



40 



AN 



ENGINEERING 



NEWS RECORD 



REPXINT 







. . . conventional suspended span in contract award for . . . 

Europe's Longest Suspension Span 



The Portuguese government has ap- 
proved a provisional r,ward for a sus- 
pension bridge over the Tagus River at 
Lisbon to United States Steel Export 
Co. of New York City. With a central 
span of 3,317 ft, it will be Europe's 
longest suspension bridge. Value of 
the award is placed at 561,740,000. 

Fabrication of the principal structure 
will be by American Bridge Division of 
U. S. Steel Corp. Main bridge piers 
will be built by Morrison-Knudsen 
Companv, Inc., Boise, Idaho. D. B. 
Steinman, New York consultant de- 
signed the bridge. Other leading con- 
tractors and engineers will participate 
as suppliers, subcontractors or con- 
sultants. 

Financing of the project will come 
entirely from outside Portugal, with 
loans to be made by the Export-Import 
Bank and by Seligman & Cic of Paris. 
The latter will participate to the extent 
of 85 million new French francs ($17.- 
347,000), which will be used for local 
expenditures in Portugal. 

Announcement of the provisional 
award climaxes competition (first an- 
nounced in April, 1959) to design, build 
and finance the bridge. In addition to 
the U. S. Steel combination, three 
groups submitted proposals to the 
Portuguese government. The other three 
bidders were Demag of Germany, which 
stipulated that the Portuguese govern- 
ment would have to finance the work: 
Krupp of Germany, with Merritt 
Chapman & Scott Corp., contractors: 
and Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade & 
Douglas as engineers: and with financing 



sought through Blythe Bros. Co.; and a 
Portuguese firm (Socieda Atlantico 
Portuguese de Empreesamentos y Ex- 
panse) Economica) with international 
participation and backing. 

The latter combine submitted the 
apparent low proposal (ENR Mar. 24. 
p. 146) for a structure incorporating 
four cable-supported balanced canti- 
levers placed end-to-end. American 
firms involved in that proposal included 
Moran, Proctor, Mueser & Rutledge, 
New York City: Richardson, Gordon & 
Associates, Pittsburgh; and Ammann & 
Whitncv, New York Citv. 

The U. S. Steel group will build a 
conventional suspension bridge with a 
total length of 6,397 ft. Each side span 
will be 1,540 ft long. The two towers 
will be about 755 ft above their rock 
foundations, and some 626 ft above 
mean water level. Minimum clearance 
at midspan will be about 230 ft. The 
bridge will carry four lanes of highway 
traffic, with a center dividing strip and 
a sidewalk on either side. 

In addition to the bridge itself, the 
contract calls for approach structures 
and roads on both sides of the river. 
Total viaduct length is expected to be 
about 3,443 ft, with an additional 8.6 
miles of approach roads. 

Under the terms of the provisional 
award, U. S. Steel Export Co. has a 
maximum of 300 days to present its 
final proposal. The final contract will 
then be signed and will call for the 
bridge to be completed within 4i 
vcars. The final proposal is expected 
to provide for future railroad traffic. 




rnnvrlohl I960 McGrow-Hill Publiihing Company, Inc. 



All right! rei.fy.d Printed in U. S. A. 



PORT HURON 



A- TO-/*' 
.Sg 



TIMES HERALD 



PORT HURON, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 1960 




American literature is greatly 
"rnriched by the works of numer-' 
ous authors and poets who were 
born or lived in Michigan. 
Among our prominent novelists 
with no attempt to name them 
all - are . . . Julia Altrocchi, 
summer resident of Harbert . . . 
Rex Beach, of Atwood . . . David 
DeJong, of Grand Rapids . . . 
Lloyd Douglas, of Ann Arbor . . . 
Edna Ferber, of Kalamazoo . . . 
Iola Fuller, of Marcellus . . . 
Ernest Hemingway, summer re- 
sident of Walloon Lake . . . Helen 
Hull, of Albion . . . Clarence 
Buddington Kelland, of Portland 
and Detroit . . . Caroline Kirk- 
land, of Pinckney . . . Delia 
Lutes, of Jackson. 



AND . . . HELEN Topping 
Miller, of Fenton . . . Arnold 
Mulder, of Holland.. . . Arthur 
Pound, of Pontiac . . . Virgil 
Scott, of East Lansing . . . Allan' 
Seager, of Ann Arbor . . . Vem 
Sneider, of Monroe . . . Glendon 
Swart hout, of Pinckney and East 
Lansing . . . John D. Voelker, of 
hpeming, a 1957-60 justice of the 
.chigan Supreme Court who 
who writes under the name of 
Robert Traver) . . . Mildred 
Walker, of' Big Bay . . . Gordon 
Webber, of "Detroit and Flint . . . 
Maritta M. Wolff, of Grass Lake. 



"Many Michigan writers .have* 
emphasized the outdoor theme 
in their works, drawing heav- 
ily on their knowledge of our 
forests and the Great Lakes. 
In that group are . . . James 
Oliver Curwood, of Owosso . . 
Karl Detzer, of Leland . . . 
Marguerite Mary GahagaM, 
of Johannesburg.. . . Chase 
S, Osborn, of Sault Ste. Marie, 
governor of Michigan, 1911-12 
. . . Harold Titus, of Traverse 
City . . . Stewart Edward 
White, of Grand Rapids. 

Others are known as biograph- 
ers or as writers of history and 
historical fiction or as recorders 
of our folklore, including . . . F. 
Clever Bald, of Ann Arbor . . '. 
Prentiss M. Brown, ef St. Ignace, 
U- S. senator in 1936-43 and later 

chairman of the Mackinac Bridge 
Authority . . . Bruce Catton, of 
Petoskey . . . Elizabeth Bacon 
Custer, of Monroe . . . Harlan H. 
Hatcher, of Ann Arbor . . . Ulys- 
ses P. Hedrick, of East Lansing . 
. . Ring Lardner, of Niles . . . 
Charles A. Lindbw'gh, of Detroit 
. . . S. L. A. Marshall, of Detroit, 
Russel B. Nye, of East Lansing 
. . . Myron David Orr, of Alpena 
. . . Milo M. Quaife, of Detroit 
. . . William Ratigan, of Charle- 
voix . . , Constance Rourke, of 



Grand Rapids . . . Arthur H. Van- 
denberg, of Grand Rapids, U.S. 
senator in 1928-51. . . Frank B. 
Woodford, of Detroit. 

* + * 

EMINENT Michigan essayists 
include . . . Ray Stannard Baker 
(David Grayson i, of Lansing . . . 
Rev. Preston Bradley, of Linden, 
founder of People's Church, Chi- 
cago . . . Rev. Edgar DeWitt 
Jones, of Detroit . . . and several 
University of Michigan presidents, 
notably Henry P. Tappan, James 
Burrill Angell, Marion LeRoy Bur- 
ton. 

Michiganians widely known 
as newspaper editors and edit- 
orial writers include .... 
James O'Donnel Bennett and 
Carl M. Saunders, of Jackson 

. . . Malcolm Bingay, Lee 
Hills and Royce B. Howes, 
of Detroit . . •. Col. Frank 
Knox, of Grand Rapids and 
Sault Ste. Marie . . . James 
E. Scripps, of Detroit . . . Chet 
Shafer, Three Rivers humor- 
ist and founder of the Organ. 
Pumpers Guild of America. 

Prominent among our authors 
of children's books are . . . Mar- 
guerite de Angeli, of Lapeer . . . 
R. Clyde Ford, of Ypsilanti . . . 
Dirk Gringhuis, of East Lansing 
. . . and Elizabeth Howard, of 
Grcsse Pointe. 



REPRESENTATIVE of tf 
Michigan contribution to the li 
erature of science and medicir 
are the works of such write] 
as Liberty Hyde Bailey, of Sout 
Haven . . . Paul de Kruif. . i 
Holland . . . William H. Hobb 
of Ann Arbor ... Dr. John Harve 
Kellogg, of Battle Creek, foundc 
of the famed Battle Creek Sai 
itarium. 

Among our poets we point t 
Edgar A. Guest and Anne Camj 
bell, of Detroit . . . Theodor 
Roethke, of Saginaw . . . Cai 
Sandburg, summer resident c 
Harbert . . . Will Carleton (Wi 
liam McKendree), of Hillsdale . . 
Robert Frost, of Ann Arbor . . 
Gwen Frostic, of Frankfort . . 
Douglas Malloch, of Muskegon . . 
Lew Sarett; of Marquette . . 
Rose Hartwick Thorpe, of Lite! 
field . . . David B. Steinma 
(of New York), designer of Mic! 
igan's Mackinac bridge. 

James Fenimore Cooper, wm 
not a Michigan native, did h 
research work for "Oak Openings 
at Kalamazoo in 1848. 

And for many years the lal 
William Lyon Phelps, beloved Ya! 
University lecturer, literary eriti 
and author, summered at Huro 
City, Mich., attracting overflo' 
crowds regularly for his Sunda 
sermons in the village's Methodi.' 
church. 






Wheeling 
World-wide News and Pictures ^_]J 

News -Register 

■*• I Neighborhood News ■■■ ^-of a C? 250,000 Community 



SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 8, 1960 



Bridge Builder Speaks at Bethany 

Science, Religion, Art 
Pillars of Civilization 



Science,- Religion and Art are 
the three main pillars of civiliza- 
tion. Dr. David B. Steinman, noted 
bridge builder from New York 
City, said Saturday, May 7, at 
Bethany College. 

Dr. Steinman spoke at the fifth 
anr.ual spring festival of the 
school. Bethany College conferred 
the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Fine Arts upon Dr. Steinman. Dr. 
Perry E. Cresham is the presi- 
dent of Bethany College. 

Dr. Steinman dean of American 
bridge builders, has designed and 
built more than 440 bridges on five 
continents, including Michigan's 
Mackinac bridge. He is the author 
of 24 books, including "Famous 
Bridges of the World." He has 
written 600 profersional articles. 
More than 150 of his poems have 
been published in leading poetry 

magazines and in five anthologies, 
and he has received more than 60 
prizes, awards, and honors for 
poetry. 



Dr. Steinman said that "The 
complete man has three di- 
mensions: the intellectual, the 
aesthetic, and the spiritual. These 
are the three divine gifts that 
exalt Man above the beasts of 
the field. 



"The intellectual dimension is 
characterized by the passion of 
curiosity and communication, the 
impelling drive to find the an- 
swers to the questions 'How?' and 
'Why?' The scientist, the 
philosopher, the mathematician, 
dedicate their lives to the search 
for truth. 

"The aesthetic dimension is 
characterized by the emotions 
aroused by the perception of beau- 
ty and by the passion to create 
beauty. This is the dimension rep- 
resented by the inspired works of 
artists — the painters, sculptors, 
Composers, and poets. These are 
the works that enrich our lives." 



THE 




.58 




February 1960 



RATIGAN. WILLIAM. Highways Over Broad Waters. Grand Rapids 3: 
Win. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 255 Jefferson Ave., S. E. 1959. 360 
pp. 86. This major biography is the definitive life story of the greatest 
bridgebuilder in history, a contemporary figure who personifies the technical 
skill, spirit of adventure, and creative imagination of America. An intimate, 
step-by-step account of genius in action, the book traces the career of David 
B. Steinman, Manhattan-bom son of immigrant parents, from the days when 
the shadows of Brooklyn Bridge falling across his cradle were truly the fore- 
cast of coming events— the more than 400 bridges he was destined to build 
on five continents. 

As a seven-year-old newsboy, David B. Steinman dreamed of building 
a great bridge such as the one on which he hawked his paper— the Brooklyn 
Bridge— and he lived not only to see his dreams come true, but also to see 
his own name engraved on a bronze tablet affixed to the very bridge of his 
boyhood dreams, as a memorial of his having modernized the old horse- 
and-buggy crossing into a thoroughfare for today's automobile traffic. 




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CLEVELAND 
PLAIN DEALER 



CLEVELAND, FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 1, 1960. 



American Firm Gets Lisbon 
Dream Job: Span on Tagus 



LISBON i Reuters) — One of 
I he great dreams of the people 
'of. Lisbon, a bridge across -the 
River Tagus. is to come true 
in the next five years. 

The council of ministers has 
awarded provisionally a con- 
tract for the work to an Amer- 
ican firm, the United States 
Steel Export Co. The final 
award will be made when ac- 
tual building plans have been 
submitted by the firm and ap- 
proved. 

The maximum time allowed 
for the execution of ,lhe work 
is 4V-j years from the date of 
the signature of the final con- 
tract. 

The plans for the bridge wore 
drawn up by an American en- 
gineer, D B. Stelnman "ho 
designed some of' the world's 
largest bridges and originated 
a revolutionary theory for su*> 
pension bridge compulations. 

The bridge is intended for 
road traffic. But the possibility 
is being considered of buildlrjg 
the-main parts of it in accord- 
ance with the requirements of 
railroad transport, so ;l will 
be possible to adapt it to sub- 
sequent rail traffic. 

The cost ol the i< nijei on 
which the adjudication was 
fixed was 1,764.000,000 escudbS 

i about 7(i million dollars). But 
this amount will be subject to 
adjustments, in accordance with 
the various conditions to he set 

floii'M in .no .». m I »»•>,-> t 



T!is».\sc!ien»:; will be financed 
entirely by means H external 
crediis as provided i«i Portugal's 
development plan, -through the 
Export-Impof'i Bank of Wash- 
ington, and '.,;. house of Selig- 
man & Cie.. of Paris. The 
charges resulting from this are 
to lie met from the income 
from the bridge tolls, within 
the convenient regime of pro- 
gressive return annuities. 

Exploitation of the bridge 
will be guaranteed by the state, 
either directly, or through an 
enterprise, in which the state 
will participate. 

The bridge now tendered for 
will have features similar to the 
large North American suspen- 
sion bridges, and will be the 
largest European bridge, and 
the fifth largest bridge in the; 
world, in so. far .is I he main 
dimensions are concerned. 

The central span will be about 
3,316 feet long, measured be- 
tween the axes of the two an- 
chor towers of the ropes sup- 
porting the bridge road. The 
tU'o side spans each will be 
about 1.542 feet long. The tow- 
n's will be about 755 feet above 
the level of the rock foundation 
in t he river bed. 

The viaducts on the two 
banks of the ritfer will increase 
the lolal length of the bridge 
to nearly two miles. The con' 
tract will include the building 
of roads giving access to the 
bridge over a total distance of 



APRIL I960 



o 

j 



THE BENT of Tau Be ta Pi 



>_ 



X«*w Hook on Dr. Si zinnia ii 



Dr. David B. Steinman, New York Alpha '06, is the subject of a 
new biography by William Ratigan titled "Highways Over Broad 
Waters." The book is published by William B. Eerdmans Publish- 
ing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan. Dr. Steinman, born and 
raised on New York's East Side, is recognized as probably the 
world's leading authority on the design and construction of bridges. 
His work is represented by major bridges in many countries, and 
•he has received countless honors for them. 






9?l A^^^Kr^V^' 1 

w a <yLxcf/e,/r£a The Bridge 

David B. Steinman 



Hazel V. Smith 




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I NUMBER 1 
U Si.., Median. 



\M4 4 « U 1 a 



anJranrisco Chromcl 

^-^ THE VOICE OF THE WEST yJ 



I 



THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1960 



Gate Bridge Can Hold 
Trains, Engineer Says 



The Golden Gate Bridge 
is sturdy enough to carry 
commute trains under its 
main deck, the Bay Area 
Rapid Transit District was 
told yesterday. 

D. B. Steinman, New York 
consulting engineer hired to 
make a $50,000 study of the 
possibility of using the 
bridge for trains, said tracks 
could be placed under the 
center of the roadway. 

"The appearance of the 
structure would be scarcely 
changed," Steinman reported. 
"Traffic would be relatively 
uninterrupted during con- 
struction." 

Steinman said the bridge 



could hold four 10-car train.'; 
at a time, with 74 standees in 
each car. 

He recommended that the 
bridge railings be replaced 
with lighcer material and thai 
the sidewalks be narrowed to 
reduce weight. 

Few structural changes 
would be required, Steinman 
added, except for a "major 
change" at the Marin end. 
New braces under the road- 
way also would be needed. 

The next step Steinman 
recommended was the con- 
struction of a new model of 
fh? bridge for wind tunnel 

tests. 



TECHNOLOGY 

and 

CULTURE 



Business Notes 



A full report of the Annual Meeting of the Society, 
held at the Museum of Sciences and Industry on Monday, 
December 28, is contained in the Newsletter recently 
sent to all members. In addition to the routine bus- 
iness of the Society, there was the special election 
of officers caused by the untimely death during the 
year of Dr. William Fielding Ogburn, the renowned 
sociologist and first President of the Society. 

To succeed Dr. Ogburn, the Society unanimously 
elected Dr. David B. Steinman, the master bridge- 
builder, who is responsible for the construction of 
over UOO bridges on five continents, among them the 
recently completed Mackinac Bridge. He has received 
many awards for his research on the aerodynamics of 
bridge structure and the application of metallurgical 
developments to bridge construction, and is the poss- 
essor of over twenty honorary degrees from American 
and European universities. His next project, which 
he believes to be the most inspiring of his career, 
is the designing of a new span across the Messina 
Straits, linking the mainland of Italy and Sicily. 
Dr. Steinman is a poet and patron of the arts as 
well as an engineer. 

Elected First Vice-President was Dr. Lynn White, Jr. 
After serving as president of Mills College for fifteen 
years, Dr. White returned to the teaching life in 1958 
as Professor of Medieval History at the University of 
California (Los Angeles). He has written and edited 
books and articles in the fields of education, medieval 
history, and technology, and his monumental study on 
medieval technology and social change is scheduled for 
publication soon. 



Spring 1960 



THE TOWER 



The Poets of the Niagara Peninsula 



TRANSFIGURED CITY 

Leaving the Western plains, we wing our way 

Above the billowed cumulus that shrouds 

The checkerboard below. At dusk of day 

We glimpse our goal and swoop down through the clouds. 

With catch of breath, we suddenly behold 
A web of roadways strung with jeweled light, 
Festoons of rubies, emeralds, and gold, 
Like fabled Baghdad of enchanted night. 

And in the glow the flashing gems impart 
To domes of glass and steel, to tower and spire, 
One feels the pulsing of a mighty heart: 
This Queen of cities, robed in lambent fire. 



D. B. Steinman 



April i960 




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May 1960 



DAIIXfl NEWS 



NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER® 



MAY 9, 1960. 



Bethany Honors 
Bridge 



Bethany, W. Va., May 7 (AP). 

— Dr. David B. Steinman of New 

York, noted bridge builder, was 

awarded an honorary degree of 
doctor of fine arts at Bethany 
College here today. He is the, 
author of 24 books, including 
"Famous Bridges cf the World." 






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MOMENT OF SPLENDOR 



Evanescent 
As a crescent 

of the moon, 
As fireflies hover 
glimmering over 

a blue lagoon, 
Love is a tender 
moment of splendor, 

dying too soon. 




— D. B. Steinman 
New York, N. Y. 




The Poesy Book 

Mansfield, Ohio 

All Seasons Edition 



-^9 



Zkc %am Door 

By D. B. Steinman 

'Hi, young feller, want to see 
Something you ain't seen before?" 
The old man led me through his barn 
And then rolled back a sliding door. 
Behind us, musty timbered gloom; 
Before us — apple trees in bloom! 

The dawn glow lent an aura to 
The orchard under springWne light; 
Soft blossoms covered every bough 
Like gentle snowflakes caught in flight. 
Faint apple breath borne on the air 
Whispered the lure of nectar there. 

A spell was traced against the blue, 
The inscape of a veil so spun 
Of petals, air and light and dew. 
"Ain't that a pretty sight, my son?" 
He understood my speechless nod, 
My silent thanks to him — and God. 



Reprinted from 
The Hoosieb Challencer 



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Zwo Poems 



By D. B. STEINMAN 



LIGHT-YEARS 

Through cosmic space the lens on Palomar. 
Scanning the aeons of galactic glow. 
Descries the ancient flaming of a star 
Whose rays ten million centuries ago 
Commenced their journey with the speed of light. 
At length impinging on our crystal prism, 
Although the source may now be black as night 
Or vanished in some titan cataclysm. 




. . . Engineer 

Designer of Bridges 

Poet 

Man of humble faith 



With powers wrested from the atom's core, 
Our priests of science batter heaven's gate. 
Who knows what doom will be the final score. 
What holocaust or glory be our fate? 
Upon some star a future eye may see 
The light we beam into eternity. 



CELESTIAL BLUEPRINT 

To sage and poet, scientist and seer, 
The ordered orbits in the firmament 
And in the atom's microcosmic sphere 
Attest this world is not an accident. 

Inspired to scan, the mind of man descries 
A cosmos governed by profoundest laws; 
The harmonies that sing in starry skies 
Are ringing aniens to a Primal Cause. 

In reverence the searching eye can see 
A universe of preconceived design. 
Creation of this vast sublimity 
Proclaims an Author, all-wise and divine. 



Reprinted from 

PARTNERS 

The Magazine of Labor and Management 



The St. Lawrence University 

CANTON, NEW YORK 

OFFICI OF THI PHISIDINT 






5 November 1959 



Dr. D. B. Steinman 
Roebling Building 
117 Liberty Street 
New York 6, New York 

Dear Dr. Steinman: 

We have awarded the Holton D. Robinson Scholarship to an unusually attractive 
and brilliant student. This young man came to my attention some month* ago. 
His name is Zafirios N. Zafiris and he came to this country to get an educa- 
tion. His father is dead and his mother and other members of the family are 
still in Greece. 

This boy last year was carrying a full schedule of college work and in the 
evening was the chef at the Town House, a restaurant in Potsdam. He hitch- 
hiked back and forth between Canton and Potsdam, a distance of eleven miles. 
He was not only paying his bills, but was sending some money to his mother 
in Greece. The Mathematics and Physics departments and Dean Romoda 
called my attention also to this young man. I have also had talks with this lad. 
His record here for the past two years is such that thePhysics department 
recommended him to the Brookhaven Laboratories for special work there last 
summer. We think he is going to be an outstanding young scientist -- possibly 
even more brilliant than Mary Jean Scott, who was graduated from St. Lawrence 
about five years ago, then took her Ph.D. in Physics at Johns Hopkins and was 
selected as one of three outstanding young American physicists to be at the 
Harwell Nuclear Laboratories in England last year. 

You will presently receive a letter from Mr. Zafiris and at some time later 
on I should like to arrange for Mr. Zafiris to meet you and thank you personal- 
ly. I am sure it will give you great satisfaction to have some part in the educa- 
tion of this remarkably promising young American scientist. I say American 
because this young man is in the process of becoming an American citizen and 
will be by July I960. 

Shortly I will write you another letter about the possibility of continuing the 
Steinman Festival, which has been such an outstanding success here in the 
past two years. 

Warm personal regards tp Mrs., Steinman and you from Mrs. Bewkes and me. 

Cordially yours 



NOV 9 $59 

D. B. STEINMAN Eugene G. Bewkes 




foretaste 

By D. B. Steinman 



Romance at sixteen is a shimmering haze 
Where lovers wander in a dreamlike daze; 
And grief at tiventy is a falcons gash, 
The bolt of passion like a thunder crash. 
Only to abiding love is given 
A foretaste of the wonder that is heaven. 



Reprinted from 
The Blue River Poethy Magazine 









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SONGS OF A BREDGEBUILDER 
Comments of Interest 

"Being a layman in your field, I have only seen bridges as structures 
of utility. NOW, I see them as the fulfillment of a poet's dream— 
and they become to me creations of beauty! " 

— CO. Anderson 

"There seems to be no limit to your varied talents as a writer, and 
these poems are certainly inspirations. " 

— John Ward Beretta 

"I have enjoyed reading these verses and wish that more of our 
engineers could see the poetry in design, even if they could not 
express it as well as Steinman. " 

— Homer T. Borton 

"It is a lovely volume, not only physically, but filled with your own 
particular brand of beauty!" 

— Joseph Cherwinski 

"I read it through at one sitting. Herein are preserved the things 
beyond price, the unassayable riches which are the essence of 
civilization. " 

— Jean C . Donaldson 

"I am delighted that representatives of the engineering profession 
are able to achieve distinction in fields that are not usually as- 
sociated with such practical problem-solvers. 

— P. G. Folsom 

"I don't know of any works so sensitive and moving. " 

— Bertha Foster 



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HIGHWAYS OVER BROAD WATERS 
Comments of Interest 



"This is a fine record of a life devoted to the engineering 
profession and the public good. " 

— George W. Burpee 

"It is a distinguished book about a very highly distinguished 
man. " 

— Thomas C. Desmond 

"This work is indeed a glorious account of the faith, perse- 
verance and gifts of a Master Bridgebuilder. . . of faith in 
his God, his fellowman, and in his own capabilities," 

— Sister Mary Angela Diffley 
D. H. M. D. S. B. 

"It is obvious at first glance that the book has been written 
in a most fascinating manner and anyone interested in civil 
engineering will undoubtedly enjoy reading this history of 
the accomplishments of one of our most outstanding designers. " 

— R. C. Goodpasture 

"So I class you (D. B. Steinman) with Winston Churchill and 
several of the others who live rich full lives and always find 
time for many and varied pursuits. " 

— John W. Johnson 

"What a saga and what nostalgic memories! Asa success 
story of a little boy starting from scratch, it should be in 
every library as a stimulus and inspiration for the young, " 

— Elias Lieberman 

"The contributions to the safety and convenience to mankind, 
the contributions to the profession in lifting the scientific 
level of engineering and the contributions to community life 
delineated in this work represent the highest ideals of the 
profession. " 

— F. J. Maher 

"This book will be an inspiring and educational work that all 
ambitious men can study and profit by." 

— Ronald B. Smith 






you Wore A White Gardenia 

By D. B. Steinman 



I met you in a garden by the sea; 

With pulses pounding, I beheld you there. 
Your loveliness was like a melody: 

You wore a white gardenia in your hair. 

My heart teas singing with a strange delight; 

To all the gods of love 1 made my prayer. 
My dreams embraced you through the starry night, 

A fragrant white gardenia in your hair. 

All else about the distant scene is dim, 

All save the moonlight magic in the air; 

One memory still lingers like a hymn: 

A white gardenia star-like in your hair. 

A lighted candle burning through the years, 

I feel your glowing presence everywhere; 

In lonely nights 1 see you through my tears: 

You wore a white gardenia in your hair. 



Reprinted from 
Hoosieb Challenges 



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8. 



HIGHWAYS OVER BROAD WATERS 



The Life and Times of David B. Steinman. 



Bridgebuildei 



This is the stranger-lhan-fiction story of a lower-Manhattan boy 

born under the shadows of the Brooklyn Bridge. It was a voung 
bridge at the boy's birth, only four years old itself, a new-wrought 
miracle of design and construction .... Somehow, the bridge must 
have cast a spell upon the boy from the moment he was born .... 
The shadows and sounds of the Bridge began to exert an influence 
upon him. and its lights at night became the guiding beacons of his 
course through life .... 

\\ itli such lines begins the story of David I?. Steinman, and through 
its more than three hundred definitive pages the fascinated reader 
discovers much more as he read? the unfolding, exciting story of a 
nation converting from horses and buggies and ferryboats to millions 
of motor cars and the great bridges that have made our modern 
mass transportation possible. But through it all runs the struggle, 
the progress, the accomplishments and the fulfillment of one boy's 
earliest dreams, until author William Ratigan's full-scale portrait ig 
completed with his last lines — 

In. humility and reverence, in a spirit of consecration, David 
Barnard Steinman dedicated his life to the building of bridges, both 
material and spiritual. In a bridge he sees "a poem in steel and 
stone — a rainbow arched across the stream — God working through 
man to confute the forces of evil and add another stanza to the hymn 
of creation." 

That is the faith of a hridgebuildcr. the engineer of highways 
over broad waters. 



If you have ever built or helped to build a bridge, you will thrill 
to this story. If you have ever crossed a great bridge thoughtlessly. 
\ou will never again do so without appreciation for its builders, for 
its amazing strength, its design, its beautv . For Highways Over 
Broad Waters is that unique kind of book that captures the essence 
of a man s life and projects it into the product of his mind and 
into the life of his time. Here you will discover the genius and 
heart of the greatest bridgebuilder in history, a poet, a lover of life 
and beauty, interpreted with rare empathy in a contemporary biog- 
raph) of a first-generation American who personifies the technical 
>kill. the spirit of adventure, and the creative imagination which 
has made America great. 



by WILLIAM RATIGAN 

inllior of Soo Canal!, Straits of Mackinac, The Long Cro.iniiig. unit 
oilier liooks of llie Inierican Epic 




Beautiful, Full Endpapers 
Engravings of Two of *he 
World's Greatest Bridges 

— The Brooklyn, 1883 
— The Mackinac, 1958 

Forty Brilliant 

Photographic Illustrations 

including a Dozen 

Great Bridges 

Twenty-eight 

Fascinating Chapters 

of a Rich Life 

and Contribution 

— see complete titles 
on other side 

360 pages; $6.00 



GIFT 
DAVID B. STEINMAlt 



FEB 11 1960 



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1910 
1960 





Published by 

Wm. B. EERDMANS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

255 Jefferson Avenue, S. E. 
GRAND RAPIDS 3, MICHIGAN 



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X . TG 140 
. S 8 



Help Me, Cord, Zo Build My Span 

By D. B. Steinman 



Anchored firm in solid rock, 

On Thy foundation let me build — 
Strong to bear each strain and shock, 

An arch of dreams and faith fulfilled. 

Help me, Lord, to build my span 

In strength and grace across the years; 
Firm in purpose, true in plan, 

Above the tides of doubt and fears. 

Help me build on Thy high road 

A bridge to serve the common good; 
To smooth the way and lift the load, 

A link of human brotherhood. 

Help me make my work a shrine, 

With glimpses of eternity; 
A humble prayer in every line, 

A bridge from human heart to Thee. 



Reprinted from 
Scimitar and Song 



to 

CO. 



Serenade 

By D. B. Steinman 

Across the lake the rising moon unrolls 

A magic carpet made 

Of shimmering brocade. 
A light breeze lifts and dies. A far bell tolls 

A moonlight serenade. 

My small boat glides along the wooded shore. 
The moon moves, broad and free, 
And arrows straight to me 

No matter where I row with muffled oar — 
A moonlight melody. 



Reprinted from 
ToETnY Public 



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Syracuse University 

Office of Information Services 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



Steinman honorary 



SYRACUSE , N. Y, — Dr. David B. Steinman, internationally known bridge 
engineer, will be one of six prominent men in the fields of industry, education, 
theology and science to be awarded an honorary degree at Syracuse University's 
105th Commencement, June 1. 

Dr. Steinman, who will receive a Doctor of Engineering degree, has been 
designing or consulting engineer in the construction of more than 440 bridges 
on five continents, including the world's largest bridge project, the 
$100,000,000 Mackinac Bridge, Michigan. 

He has received eight artistic bridge awards for the most beautiful 
bridges in America. Among the most notable of his bridges are the suspension 
bridge at Florianopolis, Brazil; Carquinez Straits Bridge, Calif. j St. John's 
Bridge, Portland, Ore.; Henry Hudson Bridge, Thousand Islands International 
Bridge. 

During his 39 years of private practice, Dr. Steinman has become a 
recognized authority on long-span bridges, design of suspension bridges and 
aerodynamic analysis of suspension bridges. His inventions and improvements 
have contributed greatly to bridge design and construction. 

Recipient of 350 honors, Dr. Steiman holds the highest award of the 
Scientific Research Society of America for his research and inventions in 
suspension bridge aerodynamics and the Kimbrough Gold Medal, highest award 
of the American Institute of Steel Construction. 

(more) 



Zhe Upstart 

By D. B. Steinman 

Flung from the fingers of Omnipotence, 

The shimmering clouds of Stardust found their place 

As whirling suns and planets, to commence 

Their ordered orbits in the realms of space. 

On one small orb, amid these blazing stars, 
A blinking biped — Man — at length appears. 
His inner light obscured by greed and wars, 
He shakes his fist and covets new frontiers. 

A puny creature in this vast design, 

He pounds his chest and shouts: "All this is mine!" 



Reprinted from 
The Hoosier Chaixenckh 



X- 72/40 
. S8 




WORLD'S 
GREATEST BRIDGE 

CONHECT.NGMICH.GANS UPPER AND LOWER PEN.NSUUS 
»T ST. 1GNACE AND MACKINAW CITY. 




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Newsletter to PA R E N T S 




1 1 ? "% 7$ 








rvml 




ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY 
















X 


-T<£/4g 
-5*8 



Steinman Arts Festival Features 
Music, Art, Drama, Literature 




David B. Steinman 



Since her founding more than one hun- 
dred years ago, St. Lawrence University 
has prided herself as being a center of 
the arts in northern New York. 

Last year a new 
vehicle for pre- 
senting programs 
in the arts was in- 
troduced on the 
campus in the 
form of the David 
B. Steinman Festi- 
val of the Arts. The 
second annual 
Steinman Arts Fes- 
tival was held last 
month, through 
Or. Steinman's generosity. 

The festival bears the name of one of 
the world's great bridge designers. Dr. 
Steinman has served as designing or con- 
sulting engineer for nearly 400 bridges on 
five continents, the most recent of which 
was the 5100,000,000 Mackinac Straits 
Bridge. 

Opening the festival and continuing for 
three performances was a production by 
the University's Mummers dramatic so- 
ciety of Arthur Miller's play, "A View 
from the Bridge ". During the four-day 
festival two showings of the award-win- 
"mg film, "Rasho-Mon", were sponsored 
•>>' the Student Union. 



William Schuman, president of Juilliard 
School of Music and prominent contempo- 
rary composer, was featured at a concert 
of his compositions by the Laurentian 
Singers, including a three-part work, "Car- 
ols of Death", commissioned by the 
University for the Laurentian Singers. 
That same evening, Mr. Schuman lectured 
on "The Composer in America". 

Also lecturing at the festival was Wil- 
liam Jay Smith, poet and critic. His topic 
was "Hoaxes in Modern Poetry". 

Handel's "Saul" was presented by the 
150- voice Festival Chorus and Orchestra 
with four guest soloists and student 
soloists. 

Running throughout the festival were 
an exhibition of paintings and drawings 
by students and a traveling exhibit. 



A high point of the festival was the 
awards convocation in which prizes in the 
creative arts were awarded. Students cited 
at the convocation were Jonathan Am- 
son, New York City; Wayne Phelps, Nor- 
wood; David Kilgore, Chester, N. J.; 
Claude Saks, Great Neck; Bonnie Pay- 
jack, Medina; Ruth Carling, Hempstead; 
John McGreivey, Saddle River. N. J.; 
Jacqueline Pitts, Wilmington, Del.; and 
Alberto Martin, New York City. 



. 



Moonlight Serenade 

By D. B. Steinman 

Across the lake the rising moon unrolled 

A magic carpet made 

Of luminous brocade, 
A path of silver light with flakes of gold, 

A moonlight serenade. 

No matter where I row along the shore, 
The shimmering mystery 
Still arrows straight to me, 

And in the rippled glow I hear once more 
A moonlight melody. 



X. TG HO 
. S 8 



Reprinted from 
Snowy Egret 



x- ■ 



J x. 



- f ~> 



. S 3 



. S 8 



The International 

Magazine Of 

Science Fiction 

Poetry 



LIGHT-YEARS 



Through cosmic space the lens of Palomar, 
Scanning the aeons of galactic glow, 
Describes the ancient flaming of a star 
Whose rays ten million centuries ago 
Commenced their journey with the speed of light, 
At length impinging on our crystal prism, 
Although the source may now be black as night 
Or vanished in some titan cataclysm. 

With powers wrested from the atom's core, 
Our priests of science batter heaven's gate. 
Who knows what doom will be the final score, 
What holocaust or glory be our fate? 
Upon some star a future eye may see 
The light we beam into eternity. 

D. B. Steinman 







4 



No. 33 






8ilem 

By D. B. Steinman 

She is like a timid fawn 
Startled by a leprechaun; 
Lithe and poised for instant flight, 
Standing at the edge of night, 
Where the forest meets the dawn. 

She lifts her head and sniffs the air 
But finds no danger lurking there; 
No evil hidden in the dark, 
No cruel shaft to find its mark, 
For who would harm a thing so fair. 



.58 



Reprinted from 
The Hoosieh Challenger 



BALLADS 

OF 

BLOSSOM TIME 



WHAT HOPE REMAINS 

By D. B. STEINMAN 

Endowed with powers noble as his creeds, 
What hope remains when man does savage things? 
His bright avowals are belied by deeds: 
He wars and plunders while of love he sings. 

But here, before our wondering eyes, there stands 
A bridge! Outsoaring gravity and space, 
It rises from the waves on shining strands 
To arch across the sky in lofty grace. 

Seen from above, a battleship appears 
Dwarfed like a toy beneath the vaulting span; 
This is our triumph over ancient fears: 
A bridge of peace, wrought of the dreams of man. 



THE BLUE RIVER PRESS 
Shelbyville, Indiana 



"i G 140 

Tribute to the Brooklyn Bridge S8 

By D. B. Steinman, Bridge Engineer, author of "The Builders of the 
Bridge; The Story of John Roebling and His Son" 



On this occasion of the 75th anniversary of the opening of the Brooklyn 
Bridge, I am glad to record my personal heartfelt tribute to this grand 
old structure, not only as "The Bridge" that has been my inspiration 
since boyhood but also as the best known and the best loved bridge in 
the world. 

When the Brooklyn Bridge was completed in 1883, it was the engineer- 
ing achievement of the century — the longest single span ever built, the 
tallest and strongest, the first suspension bridge in the world to use steel 
cables and steel trusses. Today there are bigger bridges — but they never 
could have been built had not Brooklyn Bridge shown the way. And its 
story is still the greatest bridge-building story of all. 

DREAM BRIDGE 

John A. Roebling was the pioneer genius who developed the art of build- 
ing great spans suspended from wire cables. In 1831 he came to America 
as a young immigrant, fleeing autocratic oppression and seeking freedom- 
freedom to work, to build, to achieve. During the years that followed he 
proved his talent and genius as an inventor and as a bridge-builder, in- 
venting wire rope and building one great span after another. 

In 1867 he was called to New York to plan and build his crowning 
lifework — the great span over the East River to connect Brooklyn and 
New York. For two years he worked feverishly to complete his plans, 
as though in a race against death. 

It was to be his dream bridge — the consummation of his life's ambition. 
From his first sight of a small suspension span in his student days, all 
of his longing, all of his preparation, all of his striving, were pointed 
toward his goal. By iron determination, by relentless concentration, by 
unsparing energy, by achievement after achievement, he had won this 
opportunity to create the world's greatest span. And now, from his brain 
and his soul, combining the genius of the mathematician, the builder 
and the artist, he had crystallized the vision — the lines and the form, 
the power and the grace, the beauty and the magic — of his masterwork. 
He had battled and overcome the forces of doubt and prejudice, and he 
had finally won the right to go ahead with the building of the Bridge. 






Publicity 

THE DAVIDSON PRESS 
227 East 45th Street 
New York 17, N. Y. 



For Immediate Release 



A first collection of poems by David B. Steinman, world famous 
bridge builder and designer, is announced for publication on October 15 by 
The Davidson Press of New York. The book, entitled "I Built A Bridge & Other 
Poems," carries an Introduction by Elias Lieberman, a vice-president of the 
Poetry Society of America. 

Having devoted a lifetime putting poetry into bridges. Dr. Steinman 
decided, when he was past 60, to put bridges into poetry. That he has accom- 
plished this feat is amply evidenced in this volume. 

Among the many notable bridge structures on which Dr. Steinman was 
engaged as designer and consultant are the Florianopolis Bridge in Brazil, 
the Mount Hope Bridge in Rhode Island, the St. Johns Bridge in Oregon, the 
Carquinez Straits Bridge in California, the 7/aldo-Hancock Bridge in Maine, the 
Henry Hudson Bridge in New York, the Constitution Bridge in Puerto Rico, the 
Raritan River Bridge in New Jersey and the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge across 
the Hudson. He is now completing the Mackinac Bridge in Michigan, the world's 
largest bridge project ever undertaken. 

Dr. Steinman is a Life Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 
Great Britain and past president of the New York Academy of Sciences. He has 
been honored by a dozen countries and by many universities, here and abroad. 
In 1953 he received the highest award of the Research Society of America for 
his work in suspension bridge aerodynamics and a civic medal for his work on 
the reconstruction of the Brooklyn Bridge. 



y< 













***►; 





*** 



k«** 



BRIDGES 

STEINMAN, BOYNTON, GRONQUIST & LONDON 
Consulting Engineers 



a 




T«»T« 



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Pests' Study Club *jev» jteuu-9«dic«* 



My dear Mr. Steinman: 

Asa member of the contest committee 
of the POET'S STUDY CLUB'S contest last year, I 
shared the pleasure of awarding you first place for 
your poem, BLUEPRINT. As chairman of this 
year's committee I had hoped to find another entry. 
Visualizing you as a second Hart Crane, obsessed 
with bridges, we hoped to see more of your work. 

Last month I caught a broadcast from 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY'S W. B. A. A. station of read- 
ings by Carl Sandburg, and the announcement of 
programs to fellow. I knew these would interest our 
group. When we learned that you were sponsor of 
the program, were not a youthful dreamer but a 
practical bridge engineer, unabashed to admit your 
interest in poetry to such an extent, our delight and 
our pleasure were beyond words. You have graciously 
given all the listeners a favor that will endure for many 
days. 

Very sincerely yours, 



^L%iH/H# |> K 




Ruby Anne Bright 




. ■ 



The 



American City 





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MAY 2 5 foprj 




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: W.W.WS 




/5fesT^ ISIS FEATURE 

V 'A AIR MA' 






r«« ,.e .w , DISTRIBUTED BY THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION SERVICE 

FOR USE BY NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES, OR RADIO STAT,ONS WITH OR »S CREO.T TO US.S. US I A- I PS 



No. 57-612 X- "X G_ v^-0 
F-57-444 ^ 5* 



DAVID B. STEINMAN, MASTER BRIDGE BUILDER 

When the great hanging roadway of stone and steel that now 
connects the main part of the state of Michigan with its forest-covered 
northern peninsula was completed one day in November 1957, David B. 
Steinman, the designer of the new Mackinac Bridge and 400 other bridges 
on five continents sat back in the chair in his small New lork City office 
and surveyed another piece of his handiwork. It was a short poem he had 
labored over and which he called "The Challenge." Its first paragraph 
read J 

"Nature said: »You cannot. 1 

Man replied* »I can.* 
from shore to shore, above the tides, 

He built a gleaming span." 

That pretty well sums up David B. Steinman 1 s philosophy and 
his life. For nearly 50 years, (he is now 71), bridge-builder Steinman 
has been saying, "I can" to such impossible construction tasks as the 
Mackinac Bridge. For in spanning the five-mile (8-kilometer) stretch 
of water, Steinman had to construct the world's longest suspension bridge 
in the face of such weather hazards as 40-foot (12-meter) waves, ice 
banks and tornadoes. His philosophy of "I can" enabled him, in collab- 
oration with his friend and colleague Holton D. Robinson, to enter and 

- more -